It is time to review your property tax assessment in Iowa!

Iowa properties can be reassessed each year, at of the assessor’s opinion of the market value of your property, so it is a good idea to check assessments annually. Additionally, the Iowa Department of Revenue reviews sales data, and can apply equalizers to assessments, separate from the Assessor’s work, which is another reason why you should review your tax assessment.

Notably, the assessed value is as of January 1, 2021. This will allow for consideration of any Covid-19 related impacts on property values.

Iowa tax assessments for 2020 will be out on April 2nd, but it is best to obtain the assessor information relevant to your assessment well before then. Each county has its own assessment office, and several cities, including Davenport, Clinton and Dubuque have separate assessment offices. They all have websites where you can access the property record card.

Has your assessment changed in the past couple years? Even if it hasn’t changed, if you believe the value is wrong, obtain a copy of the property record card. These are available are online for the assessor’s offices (Scott County and the City of Davenport use the same on-line system).

Review the information on the Property Record Card and be sure the land size and building size information are correct. Check the year built to be sure that is correct. If there are any errors, ask the assessor to update the information and revalue the property. Be sure the card recognizes any other changes to the property in the recent past, especially any buildings that have been removed.

If the value is too high, you can protest the assessment at the County Board of Review. The Scott County Assessor’s site lists Five Steps to An Appeal on their website, which should be applicable in other jurisdictions.

If you are unable to obtain an adjustment prior to the April 2nd date, you will need to file an appeal to the Board of Review. This is generally an informal process. Information on filing a property tax appeal can be found here. Similar information is available on other county websites. The taxpayer may ask the board to act on their appeal without a hearing. You may also request a hearing. With the Covid-19 rules, these hearings may be virtual.

Evidence supporting your opinion of value is needed whether or not you have a hearing. This can include sales of similar properties in the recent past, a recent appraisal for refinancing purposes, or an appraisal specifically requested for the appeal. Remember the date of the assessed value is January 1, 2021. The sales or appraisals need to be before, or shortly after, this date.

If you are still not satisfied with the assessment, an appeal can be filed with District Court or the State Appeal Board.

If you need any further information, please do not hesitate to contact us.

2021 Rock Island County Property Tax Appeals Are Due

Illinois tax assessments for 2020 are online as of November 21st, so it is time to review your property tax assessment if you live in Rock Island County. Keep in mind, Illinois properties are assessed at 33.33% of the assessor’s opinion of the market value of your property as of January 1st, 2020. No consideration will be given to any external factors which would change the value of your property after this date.

The County Assessor’s site lists the following seven steps to an appeal on their website.

1. Obtain the assessed valuation of your property.
2. Determine the fair market value for your property.
3. Discuss the assessment with your assessor.
4. Determine the basis for your formal appeal.
5. File a written appeal with your Board of Review.
6. Present evidence of unfair assessment to the Board of Review at the hearing.
7. Appeal the Board of Review’s decision to the State Property Tax Appeal Board (in writing) in the event of an unsatisfactory decision by the Board of Review.

Has your assessment changed? If yes, please consider many townships have an equalizer applied which will automatically result in a modest increase in value.

If you think the value is wrong, obtain a copy of the property record card. For Moline, Hampton, South Rock Island, and South Moline, these are available online. For the other townships, you may need to call or visit the assessor’s office whose contact information can be accessed here.

Review the information on the property record card and make sure the land size and building size information are correct. Ask the assessor to correct the information and revalue the property in the case of mistakes.

We recommend protesting the assessment at the County Board of Review if you feel the value is incorrect. The rules and procedures on how to file a property tax appeal can be accessed here. Appeals will need to be filed by mail since the Rock Island County Board of Review office is currently closed to the public.

You will need to present evidence supporting your opinion of value. This may be in the form of sales of similar properties in the recent past, a recent appraisal for refinancing purposes, or an appraisal specifically requested for the appeal. The sales or appraisals need to be before, or shortly after, January 1st, 2020. Certain exceptions may apply:

“In the event the contesting party is unable to submit written or documentary evidence with the complaint form, he or she must submit a letter requesting an extension of time with the complaint form. At the time the request is received, the Board of Review may grant up to a 15-day Extension.”

You can request a virtual hearing through Zoom or Teleconference. You may also ask the Board to act on the appeal without a hearing. If you are still not satisfied with the assessment, an appeal can be filed with the Illinois Property Tax Appeal Board.

Please feel free to contact us at (563) 355.6606 or info@royrfisher.com with any questions.

Mark Nelson, President of Roy R. Fisher, Recognized for Excellence

Mark Nelson, President of Roy R. Fisher, was formally recognized with the MAI Designation by the Appraisal Institute – the world’s leading organization of professional real estate appraisers. He has distinguished himself through his impressive record of work experience and professionalism in the real estate industry for the past 35 years.

Mark Nelson manages the day-to-day operations of Roy R. Fisher, as well as performing duties as the primary appraisal professional in the practice. As an active member of the Quad Cities community, Mark has chaired the Davenport Park and Recreation Advisory Board, serves on the legislative committee of the Quad Cities Chamber of Commerce, and he is active in local politics. Learn more about him here.

The Appraisal Institute is a global association made up of almost 20,000 appraisal professionals across 50 countries. Since 1932, it has advocated for the advancement of global standards of professionalism and practice, as well as nondiscrimination and ethical conduct within the appraisal industry. The Appraisal Institute provides several designations for outstanding members, including the MAI Designation, to foster a desire for continued education and professional excellence. This follow through on its mission makes it the leading professional organization for real estate appraisers for over 85 years.

The presentation of the MAI Designation is reserved for members of the appraisal community who have demonstrated good moral character, are certified in good standing as a General Real Property Appraiser and meet stringent standards of professionalism and ethics. Candidates are required to pass a rigorous, comprehensive final exam to test their knowledge, qualifications and professional experience against the Appraisal Institute’s strict criteria. Mr. Nelson will be presented with his certification at an official meeting of the Iowa Chapter of the Appraisal Institute. Congratulations from the entire Roy R. Fisher Team!

Roy R. Fisher